Skip

Equipment

For this task, you’ll need 2 pylons (5 metres apart) 


Instruction

 “I want you to skip step from this pylon to the next. Skip as best you can. So, I want you to skip from here to there. Ready? Go now.”


Rating System

Developing 

Initial 

Presence of numerous major gaps in execution

  • Fails to perform skip action
  • Upper limb action is disconnected with lower body
  • Speed highly variable or very low
  • Shuffle-like motion of legs
  • Poor lower and upper body control

Emerging  

Limited number of major gaps, but able to execute basic sequencing of the task

  • Leg action consistent with a skip
  • Arms at side or slightly reciprocating
  • Synchrony of arms to legs may be limited, but not flailing
  • Initiation of skip takes a few steps and skip is inconsistent or lost in stopping

Acquired 

Competent

     Basic level of execution with minor     sequencing errors

  • Has basic skipping action with limited but consistent arm action
  • Low amplitude and speed
  • May exhibit ramp-up in form
  • Body is tall

Proficient  

     Overall proficiency is depicted by the     quality of the movements

  • Uses arm and legs in a reciprocal pattern with good limb excursions (elbow bent)
  • Exhibits fluid and consistent skip action from first to last step
  • Good speed

Assessment Example

After having him go through the crossover task, Dan asks Scott to try skipping.

Dan sees right away that Scott is able to perform the basic skip action. His leg action is consistent with a skip, and though his arm action isn't fully developed and somewhat limited, it is consistent also. Scott keeps his body tall, for the most part. He doesn't get his feet particularly high off the ground, and his speed isn't tremendous, but his motions are steady. He slows when he prepares to turn at the cone, but he doesn't falter.

There is certainly room for Scott's technique to develop, but because he is consistent throughout the task, Dan places a mark at roughly the halfway mark under “Competent”.