Gallop

Equipment

For this task, you’ll need 2 pylons (5 metres apart)


Instruction

“I want you to gallop from this pylon to the next. Front gallop as best you can. So, I want you to perform a gallop from here to there. Ready? Go now.”


Rating System

Developing 

Initial 

Presence of numerous major gaps in execution

  • Lift off or aerial phase not present
  • Body faces sideways rather than forward 

Emerging  

Limited number of major gaps, but able to execute basic sequencing of the task

  • Lift off or aerial phase present but inconsistent
  • Upper arm motion not fluidly connected to lower limbs
  • Unable to have consistent flow
  • May falter in speed (slow to reacquire step)
  • Body may twist

Acquired 

Competent

     Basic level of execution with minor sequencing errors

  • Consistent aerial phase with synchronized upper limbs
  • Speed may be slow and amplitude low
  • Flow of gallop steps may be intermittent

Proficient  

     Overall proficiency is depicted by the quality of the movements

  • Fluid action of upper and lower body in synchrony
  • Immediate transition from start to gallop action
  • Trunk facing forward entire distance
  • Amplitude and speed are very good

Assessment Example

Before Dan takes Scott back home, he decides to run him through one more task.

He already has a sense of Scott's level of competence in terms of doing crossover steps and skipping, but he wants to know how developed Scott is at the gallop.

At first, Scott struggles to lift off the ground. Once he gets the motion going, the aerial phase of his gallop is present, though inconsistent. Scott also has a tendency to twist his body with each gallop. With the twisting of his trunk, Scott also struggles to keep his upper arm motion fluidly connected to his lower limbs.

One area that Scott shows consistency is in his speed. He moves through each gallop quickly, and Dan knows that once Scott addresses the weaker areas of his technique, his tendency toward speed will be more of an asset. For now though, Scott might want to think about going through the movements at a slower pace until he gets it down. Dan places a mark a little less than halfway along the “Emerging” line.